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Posts Tagged ‘weekly wine quiz’

Wine Quiz #126: Which One Does Not Belong

October 17, 2020 5 comments

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Welcome to the weekend and your new wine quiz!

Our last quiz was about numbers in wine. What I asked you to do is to figure out the logic (numbers) behind the items listed in the question, where each item has some sort of number associated with it, and then sort those numbers in the required order. Below are the questions, now with the answers:

Q1: Sort the following in the ascending order:

Arbois, Augusta, Douro, Rioja, Vernaccia di San Gimignano

Answer: the above list represents the very first appellations designated in the respective countries. The right order is:

Douro (1756), Rioja (1925), Arbois (1935), Vernaccia di San Gimignano (1966), Augusta (1980)

Q2: Sort the following in the ascending order:

Balthazar, Goliath, Jeroboam, Magnum, Marie Jeanne, Melchizedek, Methuselah, Nebuchadnezzar, Rehoboam, Salmanazar, Solomon, Sovereign

Answer: These are bottle sizes, so the right order is (with the link to the source):

Magnum (1.5L), Marie Jeanne (2.25L), Jeroboam (3L), Rehoboam (4.5L), Methuselah (6L), Salmanazar (9L), Balthazar (12L), Nebuchadnezzar (15L), Solomon (18L), Sovereign (26.25L), Goliath (27L), Melchizedek (40L)

Q3: From January to June 2020, Italy exported the highest amount of wine among all major wine-producing countries, at 577M liters (769M bottles). Sort this list of wine exports per country for the same period of time in descending order:

Argentina, Australia, Chile, France, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, USA

Answer: As you know these are the wine exports, all you needed to do is to find the right source of data. In today’s world, absolute truth doesn’t exist, so my source of information is the Italian online publication called Wine by Numbers, freely available for download. Here is the answer:

Italy 577M
France 455.7M
Spain 345M
Chile 225M
Australia 154.3M
Germany 120M
Argentina 84M
New Zealand 78.3M
South Africa 55.7M
USA 54M

I’m happy to report that we had one player who decided to take this quiz – Jason Brandt Lewis. He correctly answered question #2, so he definitely gets an honorable mention!

Okay, for today’s quiz, let’s play another wine game – what doesn’t belong? Below are three questions. In each question, you will see a list of items that all have a common thread – only one or two (not more than 2) of those items simply don’t belong there. Can you identify what the lists are and what item(s) don’t belong and why? Here you go:

Question 1:

Cork taint
Maderization
Mercaptan
Oxidation
Sapidity

Question 2:

Salta
Patagonia
Jujuy
La Rioja
Atacama
Catamarca

Question 3:

Madeira
Marsala
Banyuls
Port
Sherry
Sauternes

I think today’s quiz is the easiest so far, so I’m looking forward to congratulating many winners!

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

Wine Quiz #125: More Numbers In Wine

October 3, 2020 4 comments

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Welcome to the weekend and your new wine quiz!

Our last quiz was about numbers in wine. You were given a series of numbers and asked to figure out what do they mean. I gave you a few hints in the accompanying text, from which I was hoping that you would be able to figure out that all these numbers are related to appellations. Here is the answer – as numbers, unfortunately, are just numbers, and it all depends on your source, I’m also including links for my sources of information:

  1. 250 – Number of AVAs in the USA – https://www.ttb.gov/wine/established-avas. Interestingly enough, this number is already incorrect – one more new AVA was approved, so the new count stands at 251.
  2. 1908 – The year second oldest appellation in the world, Dão in Portugal, was established – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%A3o_DOC
  3. 360 – Number of AOCs in France – https://winefolly.com/deep-dive/looking-for-good-wine-start-with-the-appellation/
  4. 1 – the size of the smallest grand cru appellation in France – https://www.winemag.com/gallery/10-small-appellations/#gallery-carousel-2
  5. 1963 – The year DOC system was established in Italy – https://www.wine-searcher.com/wine-label-italy

Sadly, nobody even attempted to solve this quiz, so once again I’m keeping all the lofty prizes to myself.

This week’s quiz will be about … numbers again! I’m asking you to sort some data based on the underlying numbers. You will need to figure out what connects this data, and then sorting will be reasonably easy. Here we go:

Q1: Sort the following in the ascending order:

Arbois, Augusta, Douro, Rioja, Vernaccia di San Gimignano

Q2: Sort the following in the ascending order:

Balthazar, Goliath, Jeroboam, Magnum, Marie Jeanne, Melchizedek, Methuselah, Nebuchadnezzar, Rehoboam, Salmanazar, Solomon, Sovereign

Q3: From January to June 2020, Italy exported the highest amount of wine among all major wine-producing countries, at 577M liters (769M bottles). Sort this list of wine exports per country for the same period of time in descending order:

Argentina, Australia, Chile, France, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, USA

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

[Almost Weekly] Wine Quiz #124: Numbers in Wine

September 19, 2020 1 comment

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Welcome to the weekend and your new wine quiz!

Before we will start with the quiz, I want to take a moment and say Shana Tova to all who celebrate Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. I wish everybody a healthy, sweet, and happy New Year 5781!

Now, back to the quiz.

Let’s start with the answers to the Wine Quiz #123. In that quiz, you were supposed to identify 7 wines by the image showing on the top of the foil capsule (or a screwtop). Below are the answers:

Sadly, nobody attempted to answer this quiz, so I will have to keep the prize.

Now, let’s talk about today’s quiz – it will be all about numbers.

Numbers are an indelible part of the wine world. How many tons of grapes were harvested? How many appellations are in China? How many bottles were produced? How many years Rioja Gran Reserva has to spend in the bottle before release? How many acres are in this vineyard? Numbers, numbers, numbers… So today’s quiz will be about numbers. Below is the set of numbers, which are all related to a particular aspect of viticulture. See if you can figure out what these numbers mean:

  1. 250
  2. 1908
  3. 360
  4. 2.1
  5. 1963

As I said, all of these numbers are related in some ways. Also, depending on the source, you might see a slightly different version of these numbers, but the deviation should be minor. Ahh, and by the way, one of the questions above has a clue. Oops – I’m wrong. Actually, there are two questions above with the clues, so you have two clues to solve this quiz.

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

[Not Weekly At All] Wine Quiz #123: How Well Do You Know Your Wines?

September 5, 2020 1 comment

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Welcome to the weekend and your new wine quiz!

Yes, the wine quizzes used to be a regular (weekly) feature on these pages – however, the last one was published more than 3 years ago, so it is clearly not. Still, let’s have some fun.

The subject of today’s quiz is about the element of the wine experience which is often overlooked – the top of the bottle. Of course, we are eager to get to the content of the bottle, so who would be paying attention to the element which typically stands between you and the delicious liquid in the glass. Meanwhile, you can often instantly identify the producer just by a quick glance at the top of the bottle. Below you will find pictures of the tops of the bottles – and your task is to identify the producers of these wines. As a hint, I can tell you that majority of the wines are produced in the US, and few of the producers are quite famous. Here we go:

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

Weekly [Wine] Quiz #122: What is it?

January 28, 2017 12 comments

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Welcome to the weekend and your new [wine] quiz!

Well, today’s quiz will not be about the wine – it is about something which leaves in the parallel universe to wine. But first, let’s talk about last week’s wine quiz #121, where you were supposed to identify the wine producers based on the images of the bottle tops.

The quiz again was not very simple, as for instance, Field Recordings is a very small producer, Horsepower Vineyards wines are literally impossible to find, and Lolonis Winery, an all-organic producer from Redwood Valley in California, closed in 2011. Nevertheless, we had some answers, and I would like to acknowledge  Zak Ginzburg who correctly identified 3 out of the 7 wines – great job, Zak!

Here are the answers:

Today’s quiz will be something we also played before. Below is a picture of some berries. No, those are not grapes, and they are not used to make wine of any sort. However, in the way those berries are treated and regarded by producers and consumers alike, there are many parallels to be made to the world of grapes and wines. So the question is – can you identify those berries and also provide examples of similarities between these berries and their product and the world of wine?

img_7157

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

The answer to this quiz can be found here.

Weekly Wine Quiz #121: How Well Do You Know Your Wines?

January 21, 2017 6 comments

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Welcome to the weekend and your new wine quiz!

Today we are continuing the theme of the bottle foils and tops in the quiz from the last week – here is the link. In that quiz, you were presented with the pictures of the 6 wine bottle tops, and you were supposed to identify the producers based on those pictures.

Unlike the previous week, the last quiz got zero responses, which makes me sad. Yes, I mentioned that it was a bit harder than the quiz a week before, but was still hoping that at least some of the wine bloggers would be able to recognise the tops as they for sure encountered them on a number of occasions over the past few months. I also was hoping that my hints would be useful – nope. Well, I hope I managed to entertain you at least a little bit, and now it is time to provide the answers:

Today’s quiz should be a bit easier than the last one, most of these producers are better known. Here we go:

1. dsc_0217

2. dsc_0224

3. dsc_0231

4. dsc_0229

5. dsc_0233

6. dsc_0221

7.dsc_0227

Even if you recognize only one wine – don’t be a stranger, take it down to the comments line, you have nothing to lose!

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

The answer to this quiz can be found here.

Weekly Wine Quiz #120: How Well Do You Know Your Wines?

January 14, 2017 2 comments

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Welcome to the weekend and your new wine quiz!

Today we are continuing the theme of the bottle foils and tops started in the quiz last week – here is the link. In that quiz, you were presented with the pictures of the 6 wine bottle tops, and you were supposed to identify the producers based on those pictures.

First, I’m very happy to say that we have a winner! Jeff a.k.a. The Drunken Cyclist correctly identified all 6 wines! Very well done Jeff, you get your prize of unlimited bragging rights! I also would like to acknowledge Zak Ginzburg and Ryan Sorell – they both correctly identified three wines out of 6 – excellent work!

Here are the answers:

Today’s quiz might be a bit harder than the previous one, but please give it a try as you have nothing to lose. Here we go:

1.img_4546

2. img_4543

3. img_4549

4. img_4553

5. img_4752

6. dsc_0214

The wines above represent the USA, Chile, and Spain. And quite honestly, one of the wines above might be considered a trick question – but not too much of a trick; I will explain myself when I will provide answers. Another wine was already featured in these quizzes before, but the top looked very different.

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

The answer to this quiz can be found here.

[Weekly] Wine Quiz #119: How Well Do You Know Your Wines?

January 7, 2017 12 comments

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

“Welcome to the weekend and your new wine quiz!” – this was an opening phrase of this long-running feature on the blog – but yes, it had been more than a year since the last quiz post here.

Well, definitely welcome to the weekend, and an occasional wine quiz I managed to put together for you – this wine quizzes used to come out every Saturday, on the various wine-related subjects.

Today’s quiz is on the subject of the wine bottle tops – foils, or sometimes simply the corks themselves. I know, the bottle’s top is rarely something most of us pay attention to. Meanwhile, in a lot of cases, the picture or letters on the top are meaningful and allow you to identify at least the winery, even if the name is not spelled out. So below are the pictures of 6 of such bottle tops – please see what you can derive out of them.

Here we go:

  1. img_4076
  2. img_5833
  3. img_4750
  4. img_4551
  5. img_4545
  6. img_4556

As this quiz is hard enough, I can offer you a small hint – the wines here represent Spain, the US, Australia, and Chile.

Please place your answers into the comments section. Remember – you have nothing to lose, and by playing, you can obtain cool bragging rights. The answer will be provided next Saturday – I have enough bottle tops prepared to play another round 🙂

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

The answer to this quiz can be found here.

Weekly Wine Quiz #118: What Is It?

May 16, 2015 14 comments

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Welcome to the weekend and your new wine quiz!

Well, that used to be the ongoing theme for a while in this blog – haven’t done quizzes since January, as I can’t come up with a good theme that will allow for the long run like the Grape Trivia was. If you can recommend an interesting subject for the wine quizzes – I’m all ears.

Today’s quiz is based on something which I just recently learned. I was fascinated with that small discovery, and thus I would like to pass the newly acquired knowledge onto you – of course with a little fun, hence today’s quiz.

Below you see a picture of a bird. That bird has a pretty much a direct relationship with the wine world. Do you know what is the relationship between this bird and the wine?

BirdEnjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

The answer to this quiz can be found here.

Weekly Wine Quiz #117: How Well Do You Know Your Wines?

December 27, 2014 13 comments

The Wine Quiz series is not meant to intimidate. The whole idea here is to have fun and learn something new. When answering the questions, it is fully encouraged to use all available sources of information, including Google or any other search engine. There are no embarrassing answers – the most embarrassing thing is not giving it a try…

Yes, I know – it’s been a while since the last wine quiz in these pages. And I can’t promise that this feature is back again on a regular basis. But – as you might judge from the title of the quiz, I have a few more “bottle tops” to quiz you on. Below are the pictures of the bottle tops – and you need to guess which wines (producer for the most part) they belong.

Here we go:

1. DSC_0362

2. DSC_0364

3. DSC_0366

4. DSC_0369

5. DSC_0372

All of the wines are from the USA – some are better known, some are less, so have fun with it!

Good luck, enjoy the quiz and your weekend! Cheers!

The answer to this quiz can be found here.

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