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Daily Glass: Winning and Learning

August 29, 2022 Leave a comment

Sometimes you win, and sometimes you learn.

You never lose – learning is the opposite of winning – I think this is a better approach to life, would you agree?

I love aging my wines. The popular wine press tells people that 95% of the wines in this world are meant to be consumed shortly after purchasing. “Absolute majority of the wine is not meant to be aged,” the message says. I don’t want to obnoxiously invalidate all the expert opinions, but the subject of wine aging is a lot more complicated than the simple statement portrays.

Lots of factors play a role. The wine itself is probably the most critical factor. White wines generally don’t age too well. To be more precise, percentage-wise, a lesser number of white wines can age well compared to red wines. But this doesn’t mean that all red wines age well. For example, red Cotes du Rhone typically don’t age for longer than 4-5 years.

I wish there was an easy method to tell us, wine lovers, that “this wine will age for 30 years”, but “this one got only 10 more left”. There is no such method, however, so we need to rely primarily on our experiences. I’m not trying to disqualify all of the wonderful advice we receive from the wine critic and publications – but it would be rare to receive an aging recommendation there unless the wine is deemed of a “collector” level – which pretty much means that it will not be really affordable.

At this point, you might wonder why is all this commotion with the aging of the wines. Simple. Wine is a living thing. The evolution of the wine continues in the bottle. It is a general hope that wine can improve with time, evolve, become more complex and multidimensional.But the wine can’t evolve forever – at some point it starts “turning”, losing its delicious, attractive qualities.

It is important that the wine drinker can appreciate the beauty of the aged wine – it is not for everyone. I don’t mean it in any disrespectful way – this is simply a matter of taste. One of my most favorite examples is the blind tasting of a few Champagnes which took place during Windows on the World wine classes. After blind tasting 4 Champagnes, the group was asked to vote for their favorite Champagne. Champagne #4 got almost no votes, it was clearly the least favorite of the group of 100+ people. While revealing the wines, Kevin Zraly, our wine teacher, said “and this is why, people, you should not drink vintage Champagne”. Bottle #4 was Dom Perignon – if people would see the label before voting, you know how that would work (”drink up, honey, it is French”). And Vintage Champagne is nothing more than just an aged wine. It is just a matter of taste. The same story goes for food. For example – I love fresh oysters, and I have friends who wouldn’t put an oyster into their mouth even if this will be required to save their own life. Just a matter of taste.

But for those of us who like aged wines, that elusive quest becomes an obsession. I love the Italian term “vino da meditazione”, which applies to the wines which make conversation stop upon the first sip, and puts the whole group of oenophiles into a quiet, self-reflective state. The silence at the table becomes not deafening, but instead a very comfortable one. The silence nobody wants to break.

Okay, such amazing encounters are possible but truly rare. But the pleasure of drinking the well-aged wine is real, and this is what we are seeking. And as we don’t have the scientific method of predicting the peak of enjoyment for a given wine, we have to rely on our own experience. Which takes us back to winning and learning. When we experienced well-aged wine, we clearly won. And when the wine with age doesn’t deliver the pleasure, this is where we learn.

It is not so binary, of course. The point is that no matter what happened, we learn something. When you taste a random but amazing $10 bottle of California red blend (Toasted Head) with 15 years of age on, you learn that inexpensive wines can age too. When you taste 2002 Barolo (Fontanafredda) 10 years after release, and you see that the vintage chart declares this vintage as literally horrible, but the wine tastes good, you learn that the producer matters more than the vintage. When you taste two bottles from the same producer and the same vintage, but you love one of them and can’t stand another, you learn that bottle variation is real and that you have to always manage your expectations.

This whole rambling about winning, learning and aging was prompted by a few wines I opened last week.

First, the learning part. 12 years ago we did the Pinot Noir blind tasting with friends, with a very unexpected outcome – 2008 Hamilton Russell Pinot Noir from South Africa was the best wine in that blind tasting. I loved the wine so much that I went and got a bottle to keep. Over the years, I made many attempts on the life of this bottle, until the last weekend I decided to share it with a friend. Upon opening the wine was reminiscent of the good Burgundy, with the nose offering some plums, iodine, and smoke. But the wine quickly succumbed to the tertiary aromas of dry herbs and maybe a hint of dried fruit, and while my friend really loved it, this was a complete loss learning in my book.

Then another friend was stopping shortly after his birthday. He always liked the wines, but recently started getting really “more into it”. He was stopping by for the dinner, and when we were talking about wines a few days prior, he mentioned that he started liking the Brunello and Amarone wines. There is no happier moment for the oenophile than to learn what the guest desires to drink – the cellar is instantly paraded in the search for the best and the most appropriate bottle.

I don’t know how I came into possession of the 2008 Altesino Brunello di Montalcino Montosoli, I can only guess I got it as a present. This single vineyard Brunello di Montalcino was absolutely spectacular – beautiful cherries on the palate – not the fresh and crunchy ones, but more subdued, more elegant, eloped in the sage and other herbal aromatics. The wine was spectacular when we opened it, and when I finished the last drop 2 days later (wine was kept in the bottle with the air pumped out), I had a clear feeling of regret as the wine was not gone, but instead was still fresh and even more complex, with a promise of becoming the Vini da meditations in 10 years, same the 1999 Soldera had become for us – alas, I don’t have another bottle…

And then my pet peeve – you know how much I love Amarone. I got a few bottles of the 2006 Trabucchi d’Illasi Amarone della Valpolicella from WTSO 7 years ago. This was my last bottle, and boy it didn’t disappoint. It was absolutely beautiful in its finesse and impeccable balance all the way through. Dried fruit on the nose, powerful, well-structured wine on the palate, with more of the dried fruit, cherries, plums and herbs, and with good acidity, perfect balance and delicious bitter finish. It is not for nothing Amarone means Great Bitter – and there was this pleasant bitterness on the finish, something hard to find in most of the Amarone wines.

Here you are, my friends, my story of winning and learning. Three aged wines, two of them delicious, two that could age for far longer (learning!). One learning experience – but who knows, maybe it was only that particular bottle. Moving on.

What did you win and learn lately?

Wine Till Sold Out (WTSO) – Value Wines At Your Doorstep

November 24, 2010 7 comments

I’m sure you saw in my prior posts mention of QPR – Quality Price Ratio. I like wine in general – but being able to achieve high QPR makes it even more enjoyable.  One of the best ways to reach high QPR is to buy wine online. Wine-searcher is the best tool I know to find the wine online, but when it comes to buying wine it is hard to beat Wine Till Sold Out, or WTSO (you can now find them also on Facebook). What I like about WTSO is price (of course), simplicity, reliability and service. They do respond to your e-mails, and answer your questions! The reason I emphasize that is because when you deal with “value” businesses, often you have to give up on some of the elements, like service, for instance – and WTSO is pleasantly different. Information on the web site is simple, easy to understand and comprehensive, and wines are available on, well, first come first serve basis – yep, I missed a few wines are dearly regretted.

Just to give you an idea of what WTSO can bring you, I decided to collect the e-mail notification during one week (week of November 15th), so here is the information in the form of the table:

Date Time Wine Name Rating(s) Original Price WTSO Price Min # ofBottles % off
Nov 15 12:02a Andre Farjon La Deveze Cotes du Rhone 2007 $19.99 $11.99 4 40%
Nov 15 12:50p Charles Heidsieck Brut Champagne Reserve Rose NV WS93, WE92 $79.99 $49.99 2 38%
Nov 15 3:01p Bodega LuzDivina Amigo Baloiro Beirzo Mencia 2005 RP 91, W&S90 $30.00 $13.99 4 53%
Nov 15 4:19p Miguel Torres ‘Salmos’ Priorat Red 2007 W&S91,WS90 $39.99 $23.39 3 42%
Nov 15 7:33p Juslyn Vineyards Vineyard Select Napa Valley
Cabernet Sauvignon 2003
RP91 $84.99 $49.99 1 41%
Nov 16 12:02a Champagne Charles Ellner Cuvee De Reserve
Brut NV
WS90 $49.99 $29.99 3 40%
Nov 16 11:49a Reserve du Chateau Croix Mouton Bordeaux Superieur 2009 by Michel Rolland and Jean-Philippe Janoueix $23.99 $12.99 4 46%
Nov 16 4:18p Robert Storey Cellars Napa Valley Pinot Noir 2007 by Bill Knuttel JHN92 $31.99 $17.99 4 44%
Nov 16 8:47p Soos Creek Wine Cellars Artist Series #7
Columbia Valley Red Wine 2007
ST89, RP90 $35.99 $17.99 4 50%
Nov 17 12:01a Il Palazzone Brunello di Montalcino 2003 RP90 $90.00 $39.99 2 56%
Nov 17 12:00p Valsanzo Vina Sanzo Reuda Verdejo 2009 RP89 $19.99 $10.99 4 45%
Nov 17 3:31p Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Trilogy
Napa Valley Red Wine 2006
RP90,JHN92 $65.00 $32.49 3 50%
Nov 17 9:32p St. Supery Vineyards & Winery Elu Napa Valley Red Wine 2003 3.0L Double Magnum W&S90,WRO92 $350.00 $159.99 1 54%
Nov 18 12:03a Coelho Winery Paciencia Willamette Valley
Pinot Noir 2007
WS89 $35.99 $14.99 4 58%
Nov 18 10:55a Bodegas Y Vinedos Recoletas Vendimia Seleccionada 2004 RP90 $40.00 $19.99 4 50%
Nov 18 1:34p Feudi di San Gregorio Serpico Irpinia Rosso
IGT 2003
WRO92,TWN92, RP92+ $80 $37.99 3 53%
Nov 18 6:03p I Greppi Greppicante Bolgheri, DOC 2007 WS92,RP90 $29.99 $19.99 4 33%
Nov 19 12:01a Tom Eddy Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2005 JHN94 $90.00 $39.99 2 56%
Nov 19 1:03p Benessere Vineyards Napa Valley Estate Sangiovese 2006 JHN90+ $45.00 $15.99 4 64%
Nov 19 4:01p Gonfrier Freres Chateau de Lyde Cadillac Cotes de Bordeaux 2009 $17.99 $10.99 4 39%
Nov 19 8:02p Portal del Montsant Santbru 2007 RP93 $47.99 $23.00 2 50%
Nov 20 12:02a Maroon Winery Spring Mountain District,
Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2007
$45.00 $19.99 2 56%
Nov 20 8:42a Warwick Estate  Professor Black Stellenbosch
Sauvignon Blanc 2009
WS90 $12.49 $12.49 4 50%
Nov 20 1:07p Altesino Brunello di Montalcino Montosoli DOCG 2003 RP91, WS90 $149.99 $59.99 2 60%
Nov 20 5:05p Chateau Bizard Serre de Courrent Cotes du Rhone 2007 $34.99 $19.99 4 43%
Nov 20 6:55p Saintsbury Lee Vineyard Carneros Pinot Noir 2007 WS93 $49.99 $29.99 4 40%
Nov 21 12:03a Feudi di San Gregorio Serpico Irpinia Rosso
IGT 2001
WS94, RP92+ $100.00 $49.99 2 50%
Nov 21 11:35a Domaine Fond Croze Cuvee Romanaise Cotes du Rhone 2007 RP91 $18.99 $12.99 4 32%
Nov 21 12:47p Casali di Bibbiano Argante Toscana Red Blend 2006 WS91 $44.99 $18.99 3 58%
Nov 21 4:03p St. Supery Vineyards & Winery Elu Napa Valley Meritage 2004 TWN92 $64.99 $34.99 3 46%
Nov 21 5:50p Domaine Drouhin Arthur Dundee Hills Willamette Valley Chardonnay 2007 IWR91, WS91, ST90 $55.00 $19.99 3 64%

To give you an idea about ratings: WS stands for Wine Spectator, RP = Robert Parker, WE = Wine Enthusiast, ST – Stephen Tanzer, WRO = Wine Review Online, TWN = The Wine News, JHN = Jonathan H. Newman. Min # of bottles column specifies minimum number of bottles to buy to get free shipping, which I never saw exceeding 4. Time column specifies the exact time when WTSO e-mail arrived to my mail box.

If you will scroll through the table, you will see that during one week, 31 different wines from California, Oregon, France, Spain, Italy and South Africa had being offered. The discounts ranged from 32% to the 64%, and wine ratings had being the range of 89 – 94.

Is WTSO The place to get all your wines? Of course not – you can’t beat good wine store, such as Cost Less Wines I talked about before. However, combination of QPR and good service definitely should put WTSO on your short list of places to buy the wine from. Happy hunting!

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