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Posts Tagged ‘Grape Holidays’

Wednesday’s Meritage #159

January 26, 2022 Leave a comment

Meritage Time!

January is almost over, and as many people talked about “dry January”, it was reasonably dry – not in terms of wines, but in terms of wine events. However, February promises to compensate abundantly and offers lots to look forward to.

Let’s start with the grape holidays. Next Tuesday, February 1st, is International Furmint Day. Furmint is one of the most famous Hungarian grapes, best known as the grape behind Tokaji, heavenly nectar. Furmint also can be vinified dry, although much harder to find compared to Tokaji. Either way, you have a holiday to celebrate. Two weeks later, on February 16th, we will celebrate one of my favorite grapes – Syrah, via International Syrah Day. Syrah should be much easier to find, so no excuses. There is also Global Drink Wine Day on February 18th, but for someone who drinks the wine every day, that is not something I can particularly celebrate.

Continuing the theme of celebrations, let’s talk about celebrating not a particular grape, but the whole wine region. Monday, February 7th, will mark the beginning of the New Zealand Wine Week. Two webinars will be offered – one focused on the New Zealand wines on the global wine scene, and the second one diving deep into the world of New Zealand Pinot Noir.

To complete the subject of celebration, the last one for today is the main wine holiday of the year – Open That Botte Night, or OTBN for short. The holiday was created 22 years ago by Dorothy J. Gaiter and John Brecher, writers of the Wall Street Journal’s Tastings column. The goal of the holiday is to help people to happily part with their prized bottles, taste those wines themselves, and share them with friends, hopefully while both wines and people are in their prime. OTBN is always celebrated on the last Saturday in February, which will be February 26th this year. It is time for you to already start thinking about those special bottles you would want to open.

The next event I want to bring to your attention is Oregon Wine Symposium. While this is definitely a technical event, focused on the winegrowers, winemakers, and winery owners, the event offers excellent educational content for any wine lover. This year’s event will consist of two parts. Virtual part with all the educational content will take place February 15-17, and then the Oregon Wine Symposium Live portion will follow on March 8-9. Virtual sessions will cover in-depth Oregon wine industry, looking into the overall state of the industry, the direct-to-consumer market, the management of the supply chain, and lots more. Again, this is a technical event, offering lots to learn for those who want to learn.

Last but not least will be the first trade tasting I plan to attend in person this year – the Tre Bicchieri 2022, taking place on Friday, February 25th. This event is a culmination point of the Gambero Rosso wine publication, offering an opportunity to taste the best of the best Italian wines selected during the prior year, those awarded three glasses rating by the publication. Tre Bicchiery is one of my favorite tastings of the year, usually full of great discoveries – here is the retrospective of the events I attended in the past. Considering that there was no Tre Bicchiery event in 2021, I can only hope that we will see some great wines at the event, and I will actually be able to plan my attendance properly to taste the most coveted wines, instead of finding a table with only empty bottles, as already happened at my first Tre Bicchieri event, and the empty bottles at the table were the legendary Masseto. The event will travel around the USA, with the stops in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, New York, Boston, and Houston, so hopefully, you will get your chance to attend.

That’s all I have for you for today. The glass is empty, but the refill is on the way. Cheers!

Wednesday’s Meritage: Malbec Day, How to Serve Wine, Making Money with Your Blog, and more

April 6, 2016 4 comments

Meritage Time!

Welcome to the used-to-be-regular-and-now-extremely-occasional meritage issue, where I share with you different wine related news bits and pieces which I recently came across over the internet.

Let me start from a bit of SSP: here is the link to my own (ahh, unthinkable!) April 1st post, where I managed to convince a few people about some interesting [non-]happenings in the ever amazing world of wine – please scroll through the comments section, you will see what I mean.

I’m sure that when it comes to serving wine, most of you are confident in your abilities to do it easily and properly. Or, are you? For instance, when opening the bottle of sparkling wine, what do you twist – the cork or the bottle? Or – why, when and how do you decant the wine? All of these and many other wine serving questions are answered very well in this “Serving Wine – The Ultimate Guide for Wine Enthusiasts“.

I honestly have to admit – I like to teach people. No, not in the annoying way of providing the advice nobody asked for – but in the situation when I have genuine knowledge to share and the recipient actually stand to learn something. My main problem comes from the fact that more often than not, I have to convince people to “Do as I say, not as I do!” – not that good, huh? Case in point – the advice on how to make money with your blog. Dedicated page in my blog contains a number of references to the posts which actually teach you how one can make money with the blog – and I didn’t even try to follow any of that advice. To top it off, I’m going to add there two new links I came across recently, on the same subject of blogging and money. First, here is the link to the site which gives you practical advice and examples of blogs which are making money. And then here you can find a detailed analysis  of 23 top bloggers making money from their blogs – just as a reference, note that combined monthly income of those 23 profiled bloggers exceeds $900K. I will add these two references to my blogging tips page for future references.

Last but not least for today – Malbec Day is coming! Malbec’s popularity dramatically increased over the past 4-5 years, with soft and supple wines appealing to wide range of wine drinkers. We are going to celebrate International Malbec Day on Sunday, April 17th – find your favorite bottle of Malbec and get ready for the festivities. Along the same lines, I would like to share with you the Wine Lover’s Calendar for 2016, which contains references to all the grape holidays and “wine months” – want to make sure that you will not miss out on any of these very important opportunities to drink more wine holidays.

And we are done here. The glass is empty – but refill is on the way! Well, it will arrive at some point, I promise. Cheers!

 

Thank you, #GrenacheDay

September 19, 2014 2 comments

September 19th was yet another “wine holiday” – the Grenache Day. Grenache, which is known in Spain as Garnacha, needs no introduction for the oenophiles. One of the most planted red grapes in the world. A star of Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Priorat, California, Australia and many other countries and regions. A grape with the middle name “rich and opulent” (when was the last time you had a lean Grenache wine? No rush, think about it…). If big wines are your territory, Grenache is definitely your grape.

So what this “thank you” all about? Easy, let me explain. When I know about the certain “grape day”, I usually try to honor it by opening the wine made with that specific grape. Considering the connotation of the “holiday”, I also look for the somewhat of a special bottle. I’m not saying that I would casually open DRC for the Pinot Day (I wish I would have that choice), but still, it should be an interesting bottle. Talking about the holiday at hand, #GrenacheDay, I realized that Grenache is grossly underrepresented in my cellar. Cabernet, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Tempranillo, Zinfandel – plenty of choice, Grenache – not so much. Searching through the shelves, I noticed the bottle of 2006 Pax Cuvée Moriah. Checked the back label – 88% Grenache, definitely qualifies as Grenache for me. 2006 is considered young in my book, but – either that or some random non-grenache bottle. Done.

Pax Cuvée Moriah Sonoma CountyOkay, so here is our wine – 2006 Pax Cuvée Moriah Sonoma County (15.9% ABV, 88% Grenache, 6% Mourvedre, 3% Syrah, 2% Counoise, 1% Roussanne). Cork is out, pour in the glass, swirl, smell. Beautiful. Bright fruit, spices, herbs – a delicious promise. On the palate, great concentration, big, texturally present, roasted meat and bright cherries, clean acidity, an excellent wine overall. Drinkability: 8+

I stepped away from my glass with a small amount of wine left in it. Come back 15-20 minutes later, ready to finish. Swirl, sip – the wine is past prime. Touch of stewed fruit and over-ripe plums. The wine completely transformed. So here is the “thank you” part. If it wouldn’t be for the “grape day”, I would still be waiting for the right moment. Only to find out at some point that all the pleasure was gone, without been experienced. Thanks to the #GrenacheDay, we were able to experience this wine still at its peak (it was only a tiny amount in the glass which turned around).

Let’s raise the glass to the grape holidays, the experience savers. Cheers!

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