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Posts Tagged ‘wine infographic’

Wine and Bacon? Why Not?!

January 15, 2019 10 comments

There is a good chance that you love good food and wine pairing as much as the next connoisseur. We all know that successful pairings are very far from trivial, and we also know that not all the foods are good with the wine.

So have you ever thought of pairing bacon with wine? I’m sure that there is a very good chance that such a pairing never crossed your mind, despite the fact that you might love each one on its own – bacon and wine – almost religiously (there are lots of people in this world who will start drooling just at a sound of the word “bacon”).

Before we continue – or before you stop reading this as you don’t eat bacon for whatever reason (religious, veganism, anything) – I need to ask you (beg you?) – please do not fret. Bacon doesn’t have to be made out of pork! In today’s world, besides turkey bacon, which I agree is generally very pedestrian and not satisfying, there are also Beef Bacon, Duck Bacon, and even variety of Vegan Bacon – your life doesn’t have to be bacon-less, even if pork is off the menu for good.

What wine to serve with bacon is typically not the question you are facing, though. The main reason is that in the direct form – a slice of bacon and a glass of wine – they belong to the different, non-overlapping “time zones”. Bacon is a morning food, and wine, umm, really not. Yes, bacon easily takes on the role of a condiment at lunch and dinner, but then it is a whole another story in terms of the wine pairing.

But then there is brunch, where bacon is still a star, and who doesn’t like a glass of wine with their brunch? Or have you ever enjoyed bacon-wrapped dates stuffed with the blue cheese, so popular in many Spanish restaurants? So maybe bacon can be and should be paired with wine? Folks at Drinkable Gifts surely think so, and they even came up with infographics to illustrate their bacon and wine suggestions. As I’m an infographics junkie, I’m happy to share it with you. You can find all the detailed bacon recipes and pairing suggestions here.

I’m also curious in your opinion if you think suggested pairing combinations will work. Enjoy!

Source: DrinkableGifts.com

Do You Prefer Montepulciano or Montepulciano?

December 22, 2016 14 comments

Nope, no typo in that title. And no, I’m not losing it. Not yet anyway.

Yes, the title is purposefully misleading. But within a reason – and I’m not looking to gain any unjust benefit from the confusion.

As most of you know, Montepulciano happened to be the name of the indigenous Italian grape, popular in central regions of Abruzzo and Marche. Montepulciano is also the name of the small medieval town, right in the heart of Tuscany, where the grape called Sangiovese is a king. The wine produced around the town of Montepulciano, which dates back to the 14th century, is called Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, and to be called Vino Nobile the wine should contain at least 70% of Sangiovese grapes. What is also worth mentioning that Vino Nobile di Montepulciano was the very first DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) in Italy, awarded in 1984 – the emphasis here is on Garantita, denoting highest quality Italian wines.

A picture worth thousand words, so here is an infographic which nicely lines up all the confusing Montepulciano:

Montepulciano Infographic Italy

Infographic courtesy of Mosiah Culver

Now, let’s go back to the main question, only let’s ask it in a less controversial way –  do you prefer Montepulciano or Vino Nobile di Montepulciano wine? The answer to such a question requires some wine drinking, so let’s fight it off with maybe some of the very best examples of both – Masciarelli Marina Cvetić Montepulciano d’Abruzzo and Avignonesi Vino Nobile di Montepulciano.

Masciarelli Tenute Agricole was established in 1978 by Gianni Masciarelli in San Martino, Chieti Abruzzo. In 1989, Giovanni married Marina Cvetic, who took over winemaking duties. Today Marina overseeing about 750 acres of estate vineyards, producing about 2.5 million bottles a year – of course, not only Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, but many different wines – you can find more information here.

The wine we are tasting today, Masciarelli Marina Cvetić Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Riserva, is a flagship wine, which won numerous accolades from the critics around the world, and it is definitely a beautiful example of how good Montepulciano wine can be.

Avignonesi estate was founded in 1974, and the Avignonesi family was instrumental in helping the regions to obtain DOCG status and promote Vino Nobile wines worldwide. From 2009, the estate, which comprise today 495 acres of vineyards in Montepulciano and Cortona appellations and produces about 750,000 bottles per year, is owned by Virginie Saverys. She works tirelessly to convert the estate to organic and biodynamic winemaking, and Avignonesi is expecting to get its organic certification in 2016. You can learn more about the estate and its wines here.

The wine we are drinking today is Avignonesi Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, which goes way beyond the requirements of the DOCG and made from 100% Sangiovese sourced from 8 best vineyards of the Avignonesi estate. If you will look at the suggested price ($29), in conjunction with the quality, this wine would easily beat many of its famous Brunello neighbors. Many critics also concur, as the wine repeatedly gets high scores and makes to the various “Top” lists.

Here are my notes for these two wines:

2011 Masciarelli Marina Cvetić Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Riserva (14% ABV, $28, 100% Montepulciano, 12/18months in oak barriques, 100% new)
C: dark garnet
N: cherries, tar, roasted meat, undertones of sage
P: sweet cherries, perfume, open, layered, clean, good balance, very approachable and ready to drink from the get go
V: 8/8+, sexy, luscious and delicious

2013 Avignonesi Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG (14% ABV, $29, 100% Sangiovese, 12 months French barriques, 6 months large Slavonian oak casks, 6+ months in the bottle)
C: brilliant ruby
N: herbs, sage, hint of black fruit, restrained
P: sweet and tart cherries, earthy, leather, touch of cherry pits, touch of tannins, good balance. Very long finish with fruit dominating.
V: 8. surprisingly ready to drink (unlike some Vino Nobile which I had before). Classic Italian wine all around, with finesse.

As you can tell, I really liked both wines, probably hedging a bit more towards Montepulciano d’Abruzzo – these are very well made wines, different and excellent in its own right – and by the way, both would perfectly brighten up your holidays :).

What do you think? Which Montepulciano would you prefer, not only from these two wines but in general? Cheers!

Wednesday’s Meritage – Wine Quiz Answer, Self-directed Rant, Ouch and more

December 19, 2012 2 comments

Meritage time!

As usual, let’s start from the answer to the weekly wine quiz #41, Which one doesn’t belong. I would estimate the complexity of the quiz as medium, as you had to figure out what the question was all about, and then think about what item doesn’t belong to the list (and even explain why). I’m glad to report that we have a winner, who is being quite persistent at winning lately – thedrunkencyclist. He properly identified that Corton, which is a Grand Cru Appellation from Côte de Beaune, doesn’t belong to the list of Grand Cru appellations from Côte de Nuits. Well done, Jeff – and a double amount of unlimited bragging rights is all yours, as you were able to answer the question without the use of Google.

Before we get to the interesting stuff, I need to let some cringe out of the system – so we are getting to my self-directed rant. Let me just scream it out loud – I HAVE SO MANY BLOG POSTS IN MY HEAD AND I CAN’T GET THEM OUT! There, I said it. I don’t think this is a writer’s block, and if it is, it is some very sophisticated masochistic form. I have posts which should’ve been written during summer when I visited wineries in New York Hudson region. Then there were great wine tastings I had all the intentions to write about. We had an amazing time in October at Paumanok winery – and this blog post still sits in the drafts section. The list can go on and on. I still can’t figure it out how this stuff works, and it is upsetting. But – now, that I let it out of the system, I will make sure truly hope all those belated posts will follow. Okay, this is the end of my rant.

Now, there are few interesting things I want to share with you. First is what I called an “ouch” – it appears that Natalie MacLean, a well known wine writer, who has eponymous web site and iPad/Android App, had being borrowing stealing wine reviews from the other wine writers, including the reviews located on “subscription-only” web sites, such as Jancis Robinson, without any acknowledgement to the actual authors. Palate Press put out a big article on the subject, which is worth reading, including the comments section. The story of course reverberated on multiple blogs. Hopefully her readership will adjust accordingly (but I guess we will never know).

Folks behind Wine Folly published a very interesting infographic chart for the different types of wine. As a mind mapping junkie, I can only applaud any efforts to classify an extremely diverse subject, such as wine world, in a compact and comprehensible fashion. Take a look at the link above and let me know what you think (hint: this chart might be a good present for the wine geek in your life).

That’s all I have for you, folks. The glass is empty, but it will be definitely refilled soon. Happy Wine (and Whisky) Wednesday. Cheers!

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