Home > Cabernet Sauvignon, California, Lodi, wine information, wine recommendations, wine stores, Zinfandel > Celebrate The End Of BBQ Season with The Federalist, The American Craft Wine

Celebrate The End Of BBQ Season with The Federalist, The American Craft Wine

The Federalist LogoHere you have the title I’m really not sure about.

Let’s see.

The end of the BBQ Season. First, who said that BBQ season is ending? Even on the East Coast of the USA people proudly fire up their grill in January, bragging about battling knee-deep snow. Never mind California, and let me not offend the South. So what’s ending?

What’s BBQ? When I grill the steak on a gas grill, is it classified as BBQ, or is the open fire required? Is charcoal qualified as a source of fire, or do I have to use the actual wood? Food is not as polarizing as politics these days, but it still has its share.

And then even if BBQ season is ending, is that something worth celebrating?

Never mind all this blabbering, as maybe the most important question is: what is The American Craft Wine?

Let’s watch this short clip:

 

If you will search online for the “American Craft Wine”, The Federalist will be the very first link which will come up. The Federalist is the winery in California, which makes a range of traditional American wines, and defines itself as “Born from the virtues of every forward-thinking, hard-working, red-blooded American, this is The Federalist. This Is American Craft Wine.”

Is craft wine an answer to the craft beer, an extremely popular consumer category (if you ever “checked in” on Yelp, “do they serve craft beer” question is one of the most popular ones while filling up a small check-in questionnaire)? Beer is often associated with BBQ, and of course, it is better to be a craft beer. But why not a craft wine? I think we would all agree that wine is the result of winemaker’s craft; good wine requires a good skill, a craft – so maybe The Federalist is paving a way to the new wine category?

I had an opportunity to taste The Federalist wines for the first time 3 years ago, and I liked them. Therefore, when I was offered a sample of The Federalist wines a few days ago, I was really curious to see how they will fair now, as both the style of wine and my tastebuds can easily change.

The Federalist Wines

I’m glad to report that even if my tastebuds changed, I still found the wines delicious:

2016 The Federalist Cabernet Sauvignon Lodi (14% ABV, $17.99, 93% Cabernet Sauvignon, 5% Zinfandel, 2% Petite Sirah, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc; 15 months in oak, 35% new)
Garnet Color
Coffee, dark fruit, a hint of currant, eucalyptus
Soft, approachable, licorice, sweet cherries, a touch of cinnamon and nutmeg
8-, unmistakably Lodi, generous and easy to drink

2017 The Federalist Honest Red Blend North Coast (15% ABV, $21.99, 45% Zinfandel, 24% Merlot, 20% Cabernet Sauvignon, 7% Malbec, 4% Cabernet Franc; grapes sourced from: 42% Mendocino County, 33% Sonoma County, 25% Napa County; 15 months in oak, 35% new)
Dark garnet
Blackberries, sweet oak, cassis, a hint of mocha
Firm, wells structured, blackberries, tobacco, dry tannins, dusty cherries, good acidity, good balance
8, excellent, perfect by itself, will work perfectly with the steak

Is the BBQ season ending? You’ll be the judge of that. But if you have any BBQ plans this weekend, fire up whatever you designate as your BBQ machine, and give a try to The American Craft wine, paired with your own crafted BBQ. There is a good chance you might like it. Cheers!

  1. August 27, 2019 at 2:23 am

    Craft wine sounds like a marketing term to me. And if it were used, I’d say it would have to be for a winery that uses its own grapes and make wines that are a bit different each year because of the vintage. “Craft” is like the opposite of mass produced like Budweiser or Heineken.

    • August 27, 2019 at 8:13 am

      “Craft wine” is unquestionably a marketing term. If we will look at all the wineries as a whole – not in terms of production amounts, are just as registered entities, at least 90% of the wineries in the USA are craft wineries. And I don’t believe the winery have to use its own grapes to be called a craft wineries – we have plenty of so called “city wineries” around here, which buy grapes but make wines of their own style – those are definitely craft wineries. And then even big wineries, like Chateau St. Michelle, for example, make some wines which deserve to be called “craft wines”, such as the Artist Series or Col Solare. An interesting subject for sure – might be worth its own post 🙂

  2. August 28, 2019 at 2:13 pm

    I enjoyed the wines when I tasting them a few years back also. The fact that the famous battle in history took place right by where I live in New Jersey adds to the fun of the wine Dueling Pistols Honors Dueling Grounds
    bit.ly/duelpistols

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