Home > Experiences, Italian wines, Wine Tasting > Vinitaly and Slow Wine Tastings – Part 3, Wine, And More Wine

Vinitaly and Slow Wine Tastings – Part 3, Wine, And More Wine

February 19, 2013 Leave a comment Go to comments

VinItaly and Slow Wine logoIn the first two posts I gave you some interesting stats and shared our experience with wine seminars at Vinitaly. Now, it is time to actually talk about wines.

Those of you who follow this blog for the while know by now that I mostly talk about wines with the pictures, adding a few words here and there, mostly of a very “excited” nature. If you are looking for the detailed report, I can give you two great references – blog posts by Stefano and John M. Fodera, both covering wines and wineries very extensively.

I have to thank Stefano again, as if it would not be for him, I would be pointlessly wondering from a table to a table, and surely would miss some of the gems. Stefano had a plan, and I gladly followed.

Again, if you are looking for systematic representation of wines, based on the regions and styles, [please refer to the two blog posts I mentioned above. I will just share my personal highlights. Oh, and one side note. It is so happened that I’m writing this last post about Vinitaly after attending another Italian wine event, Gambero Rosso’s Tri Bicchiery. While in general I had no complaints about organization of Vinitaly event, now I can also say that it was organized incomparably better that the Tri Bicchiery event – expect to hear my rant with the Tri Bicchiery post.

Enough words. Here are mostly pictures, with some comments, in the order of the regions appearing in the show guide.

Piedmont

Damilano Barolo

Damilano Barolo

Damilano presented two outstanding Barolos – 2008 Damilano Barolo Lecinquevigne was beautiful, round and easy to drink. 2008 Damilano Barolo Cannubi was exactly what classic Barolo is – powerful, dense, mouth-puckering, but very enjoyable at the same time.

G.D. Vajra presented 2008 G.D Vajra Barolo Bricco Delle Viole, very delicate wine for the Barolo style overall. The wine underwent a 40 days maceration (quite long) and was bottled in the summer of 2012.

Two beautiful wines from Elvio Cogno:

Elvio Cogno Nascetta

Elvio Cogno Nascetta

2011 Elvio Cogno Langhe Nascetta Anas-Cetta – bright white fruit on the nose, same on the palate, very balanced and refreshing.

Elvio Cogno Barolo Ravera

Elvio Cogno Barolo Ravera

2008 Elvio Cogno Barolo Ravera – so far it seems that 2008 vintage of Barolo is great across the board and the wines are very approachable from the beginning – perfect taste profile of Barolo (plums, minerality, earthiness) with the shot of tannins in the finish.

Liguria

VisAmoris

VisAmoris

I can’t tell you which of the two wines from Vis Amoris I liked more. 2011 Vis Amoris Rivera Ligure di Ponente Pigato Dome – beautiful, toned down fruit, soft and opulent, more in style of Rhone whites, very refreshing and balanced. 2011 Vis Amoris Rivera Ligure di Ponente Pigato Verum was a touch bigger and brighter, showing very soft tannins without being fermented in oak. Truly two wonderful white wines.

Lombardia

Ar Pe Pe Nebbiolo

Ar PePe Nebbiolo

Two excellent Nebbiolo-based wines from Ar.Pe.Pe2001 Ar Pe Pe Valtellina Superopre Sassella Rocce Rosse Riserva and 2005 Ar Pe Pe Valtellina Superopre Sassella Ultimi Raggi. The 2001 Riserva was one of the most delicate expressions of Nebbiolo I ever tasted, but it was perfectly balanced and very enjoyable.

Veneto

Veneto = Amarone – okay, never mind, this is just my personal biased statement, Veneto is actually a home to many great wines outside of Amarone. But – once you taste Trabucchi wines, Amarone will be on your mind.

DSC_0102 Trabucchi

Trabucchi Valpolicella

While Trabucchi had only 2 wines listed in the book, they brought a substantial line of wines to the tasting. 2003 Trabucchi “Terre del Cereolo” Valpolicella Superiore DOC was probably the best Valpolicella I ever tasted – round, supple dark fruit expression, dark chocolate undertones, very balanced. 2007 Trabucchi d’Illasi Terra di San Colombano Valpolicella Superiore DOC, was very comparable, concentrated, round and again very balanced.

Trabucchi Amarone

Trabucchi Amarone

While 2004 Trabucchi Amarone della Valpolicella DOC and  2006 Trabucchi d’Illasi Amarone Della Valpolicella were very good, 2004 Trabucchi d’Illasi Amarone Della Valpolicella Cent’Anni was spectacular. Perfectly balanced, without any “over the top” fruit, showing dry fruit flavors on the nose, and showing full bodied, balanced and very polished wine on the palate. Definitely a highlight of the event.

Trabucchi Recioto and Dandarin

Trabucchi Recioto and Dandarin

2005 Trabucchi d’Illasi Dandarin Rosso Veneto IGT was quite unusual – a blend of traditional Valpolicella varieties Corvina, Corvinone and Rondinella, with 30% of  Teroldego and Syrah – slightly different flavor profile compare to Amarone, but quite powerful and expressive. One of the true gems of the day was 2006 Trabucchi d’Illasi Recioto Della Valpolicella – grapes for this wine were dried for 6 month ( typical length of Appasimento process for Amarone wines is 110 –  120 days, i.e. up to 4 month). Tremendous concentration of the dried fruit ( figs, raisins), supported but vibrant acidity – you have to try this wine to believe it!

Before we leave Veneto, a quick stop in Soave, at Pieropan winery:

Pieropan Calvarino

Pieropan Calvarino

2010 Leonido Pieropan Soave Classico Calvarino is a single vineyard blend of Garganega and Trebbiano – showing excellent minerality both on the nose and the palate, very round and refreshing.

Pieropan La Rocca

Pieropan La Rocca

2010 Leonido Pieropan Soave Classico La Rocca is another single vineyard wine, 100% Garganega, showing more restrained fruit than the previous wine, as well as a touch of butter on the palate. Definitely a very nice wine.

Friuli Venezia Giulia

 Le Vigne Di Zamo

Le Vigne Di Zamo

Two beautiful wines from Le Vigne di Zamo in Friuli. 2010 Le Vigne di Zamo Colli Orientali del Friuli Friulano Vigne Cinquant’Anni ( that was one long name) had perfect nose of raisins, and supple, round white fruit on the palate, medium body and balancing acidity. 2011 Le Vigne di Zamo Colli Orientali del Friuli Pinot Grigio was one of the best Pinot Grigio wines I tasted in a while ( yes, I don’t drink too many of them), with good fruit and touch of minerality.

Toscana

Caberlot trilogy

Caberlot trilogy

Podere Il Carnasciale makes only about 3,200 bottles a year, all in the magnum size. All made out of the grape called Caberlot, which is an officially recognized hybrid of Cabernet Franc and Merlot. All Magnums. And all magnificent. We tasted 2009, 2008 and 2004 vintages of Podere Il Carnasciale Caberlot – both 2009 and 2008 were somewhat similar, showing perfect trait of Cabernet Franc green profile with fresh raspberries. And 2002 was whole another story:

Caberlot 2002

Caberlot 2002

Take a look at the number at the bottom of the label – we were drinking the bottle number 4! Tobacco, pepper, dark fruit and perfect complexity – a Wow wine without any doubts. I wish the wines would be a bit more affordable… May be someone wants to get me a present?

Umbria

Tabarrini Montefaloc Sagrantino

Tabarrini Montefaloc Sagrantino

We tasted two great wines from Tabarrini (yes, I know, I’m abusing “great” and “beautiful” in this post – but hey, these are the highlights – if I don’t think the wine was great, I’m not going to bother you with the detail…). 2010 Tabarrini Adarmando is made out of Trebbiano Spoletino, which is very different from the Trebbiano di Soave – Trebbiano Spoletino grows in the huge vines and it is a very late ripening variety (beginning of November). The wine had perfect acidity and bright fruit, somewhat of a citrus profile – very enjoyable. Next we tried 2008 Tabarrini Sagrantino di Montefalco  Campo Alla Cerqua – perfect power, dark fruit, very balanced.

Marche

Villa Bucci

Villa Bucci

There were quite a few very good wines coming from Marche. 2010 Marotti Campi Lacrima di Morro D’Alba Superiore Orginolo was excellent, very open and food frendly ( or shall we say, food-craving), with very subtle warm fruit nuances. 2009 Villa Bucci Verdicchio dei Lastelli di Jesi Classico Riserva had perfect fruit on the nose and it was very light and refreshing. 2009 Villa Bucci Verdicchio dei Lastelli di Jesi Superiore had very good depth and clear fruit expression. Both Villa Bucci wines are expected to age very well. 

Lazio

Frascati Girl

Frascati Girl

First, we found a very friendly girl.

Frascati Racemo

Frascati Racemo

Then we found an excellent white wine 2011 L’Olivella Frascati Superiore Racemo. This wine is a blend of malvasia puntinata, malvasia del Lazio, malvasia di Candia, tgrebbiano and bellone – the wine was very round, with excellent acidity and white fruit.

Abruzzo

Donna Greto Pecorino

Donna Greto Pecorino

2010 Cantina Frentana Pecorino Donna Greta is 100% Pecorino. Very long maceration ( 8 month) allows to achieve a very nice complexity. White fruit, touch of minerality, good balance.

 

Sicilia

Planeta wines

Planeta wines

Last, but not least for this post – Planeta from Sicilia, one of the best Italian producers overall. 2010 Planeta Cerasuolo di Vittoria Classico Dorilli – beautiful nose, fresh fruit, strawberries on the nose and the palate. 2011 Planeta La Segreta had very nice nose of dark fruit, and perfect dark fruit expression on the palate. 2008 Planeta Santa Cecilia was soft and approachable, with nice soft fruit.

Aren’t you tired yet to look at all these pictures and enjoy all those wines vicariously? There were lots more of excellent wines presented at the event – but we have to call it a post. That’s all I have for my Vinitaly and Slow Wine report, hope you got the idea of what was happening at the event. The next event post I will be writing about Gambero Rosso, and I believe it will be even more difficult that this one. Until that time – cheers!

  1. February 19, 2013 at 12:54 pm

    Awesome overview of the top of the crop, Anantoli!
    And once again, many thanks for your kind words 🙂
    I really appreciated attending these two events together and I look forward to more get together’s, even in an “informal” context to come!

    • talkavino
      February 20, 2013 at 7:20 pm

      Thanks, Stefano, and thank you for adding links to your posts!

      • February 20, 2013 at 7:24 pm

        You are very welcome, my friend: always a pleasure 🙂
        Oh, and I just realized that in my previous comment I inadvertently misspelled your name: sincere apologies for that – can you edit my comment and fix it? Sorry!

  2. February 19, 2013 at 4:34 pm

    Wow, looks amazing. I had my first Valtellina this past week and loved it. Wish I were there!

    • talkavino
      February 20, 2013 at 7:21 pm

      It was definitely a great experience. Hopefully Vinitaly tour will visit Austin one day – but also you can always consider going to Verona : )

  3. February 20, 2013 at 11:32 am

    Very nice post. Glad to see you got to try so many different wines. I’ve never had the 2003 Trabucchi Terre del Cereolo (only tried the 2006 and 2005 vintages).
    Did you buy any wines at the fair? Would be the perfect occasion to take some wines home or not 🙂

    • talkavino
      February 20, 2013 at 7:23 pm

      Thanks, Julian. in US, nothing is sold at the event, so this is a moot point – otherwise, I would consider but it all depends on the price points.

  4. February 21, 2013 at 9:03 am

    Great summary!! I was at VinItaly, but it was such a whirlwind! Sadly, I arrived later than I had hoped (silly work meetings) so I didn’t get to taste all I had wanted. Thanks for the recap!

    • talkavino
      February 25, 2013 at 8:30 am

      Yes, these events need time…

  5. February 5, 2014 at 7:44 am

    Great job and very enjoyable reading, Anatoli!
    Best regards
    Dina

    • talkavino
      February 5, 2014 at 8:07 am

      Thank you, Dina, glad you liked it!

  1. February 19, 2013 at 1:13 pm
  2. February 19, 2013 at 1:14 pm

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