Home > Italian wines, wine ratings, wine recommendations > Daily Glass: For The Love Of Appassimento

Daily Glass: For The Love Of Appassimento

October 10, 2021 Leave a comment Go to comments

Appassimento is an Italian word that means “drying”. Thus very appropriately, appassimento is the process where after the harvest, grapes are dried for some time (from 3 weeks to 6 months) before being pressed and fermented. Now, the question to the audience: name any wine (just type, no need for producer) which is made from such dried grapes?

If you said Amarone della Valpolicella, Passito di Pantelleria, Recioto di Soave, or Recioto della Valpolicella, you can definitely give yourself a high five. While this method of wine production originated in Greece, Italy produces most of the appassimento wines in the world. Drying of the grapes increases the concentration of flavors and sugars and changes the structure of the tannins, bringing an extra layer of complexity to the wine.

While getting more complexity is great for any wine, it also comes at a cost. Drying of the grapes requires additional space, whether inside with good ventilation, or outside under the sun. There is additional time required to dry the grapes. And while drying, grapes lose moisture, thus you need to use a lot more grapes to get that same bottle of wine – no wonder Amarone is usually an expensive wine – but if you ever experienced good Amarone, or Passito, Recioto, Sfursat (Sforzato di Valtellina), Vin Santo, you know that it was well worth it.

Making wines from partially dried grapes is not limited only to Italy – I had delicious Australian Shiraz made from partially dried grapes (Alfredo Dried Grape Shiraz from South Australia), Pedro Ximenez Sherry from Spain. Overall, the wines from dried grapes are produced in most of the winemaking regions – Eastern Europe, Germany, Greece, USA, and others.

The appassimento wine which I would like to bring to your attention today is produced in Italy, but it is far from common. Nero d’Avola is known to produce big, well-structured Sicilian reds. But when you take Nero d’Avola grapes from four of the areas in Sicily where Nero d’Avola is known to grow best, then you dry the bunches of the grapes for 3 weeks in fruttaia (well-ventilated rooms) and then continue to make wine, you end up with delicious, round, perfectly approachable wine in its youth.

2019 Cantine Ermes Quattro Quarti Nero d’Avola DOC Appassimento (14% ABV, 100% Nero d’Avola, 4 months in 500l oak barrels) is produced by Cantine Ermes we spoke about earlier this year – the coop of 2,355 producers, farming 26,000 acres across a number of provinces in Sicily. The wine was ready to drink from the get-go, offering beautiful dark berries medley with sweet oak, herbs, and a hint of dried fruit, exactly as one would expect when appassimento is involved – soft, layered, comforting, and dangerous – the bottle was gone very quickly, not being able to put the glass down.

This was a perfect example of the appassimento wine – yes, it didn’t have the power of Amarone, but it also didn’t need any cellaring time, offered instant gratification, and it is a lot more affordable. Definitely the wine worth seeking.

Now, what are your favorite appassimento wines – Amarone and not?

  1. October 12, 2021 at 2:54 am

    My favorite passito is probably Passito di Pantelleria Ben Ryè by Donnafugata. Great complexity and balance. I’ve recently been to Valtellina and really like the Sfursat they make there.
    I wonder why the wine you featured is called 4 quarters, because I didn’t get that from the description. I would have expected a blend of 4 varieties in equal parts or something like that.

    • October 12, 2021 at 7:46 am

      I love Sfursat wines – probably as much as good Amarone 🙂 I don’t know if you tried anything from Nino Negri – amazing wines. Also they have harvest videos which involve helicopters…
      For the Quattro Quarti, I mentioned that the grapes are sourced from 4 best Nero d’Avola vineyards in Sicily – this is the reason for the wine’s name. I will add clarifying note to the text.

      • October 12, 2021 at 7:55 am

        Looks like I read it too quickly, sorry!
        I have actually visited the Nino Negri winery last month! And brought home both regular Nebbiolo from 3 different crus and two sfursats. Amazing wines indeed.

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